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Re: Steam and snowy mountains on Iron Ore RR

July 02, 2019 03:50PM
JohnM's comment about my photo of an 0-6-2 cog engine on the Erzbergbahn (Iron Mountain Railroad) in Austria, got me to thinking about posting some more photos even though this line is standard gauge. I got to rationalizing that the Iron Mountain Railroad had virtually all of the attributes of a narrow gauge railroad, including spectacular mountains, steep grades, ancient steam engines, heavy trains with rear end helpers, passenger cars with open end platforms, and massive snow in the winter. So this line resembles a narrow gauge in all but gauge.

My wife and I took a train from Garsten, where we had chased the narrow gauge Steyrtalbahn, shown below but covered in more detail earlier this spring (April), to Hieflau, the northern end of the Iron Mountain Railroad to Leoben.

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The train ride from Garsten to Hieflau took only an hour or so behind electric power

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In Hieflau we transferred to the Erzbergbahn where we rode in open platform cars popularly known as "Donnerbuechsen" or " Thunder Cans" that were some of my favorite conveyances in Germany also. Power was an 0-6-2 cog engine. For the first 9 miles or so to Eisenerz the engine ran with adhesion power only.

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In Eisenerz the engine engaged the cog rail for the stiff 7.1 percent grade to the summit at Praebichl, gaining 2,300 ft in elevation. We got off the train in Praebichl and spent a couple of days hiking to various view spots on both sides of the pass to observe the heavy freight action. Naturally, the line was not built to carry passengers, but to haul iron ore from the mine at Erzberg over Praebichl Pass to the steel mill at Leoben Donawitz. Power for the ore trains were ancient 0-6-2 cog engines, the latest built in 1909, and three 0-12-0 cog engines delivered in 1913. We were too late to see the two massive 2-12-2T cog engines that had been built in 1941, the last of which had been retired in 1968. The 2-12-2s had a tonnage rating of 330 tons on the 7.1 percent grade, while the 0-12-0s were limited to 187 tons, the 0-6-2s even less.

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Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 07/02/2019 04:53PM by Olaf Rasmussen.
Subject Author Posted

Steam and snowy mountains on the narrow gauge Attachments

Olaf Rasmussen June 30, 2019 05:54PM

Re: Steam and snowy mountains on the narrow gauge

Greg Scholl June 30, 2019 07:42PM

Re: Steam and snowy mountains on the narrow gauge

Russo Loco June 30, 2019 09:09PM

Re: Steam and snowy mountains on the narrow gauge

jameswaite July 01, 2019 12:39AM

Re: Steam and snowy mountains on the narrow gauge

JohnM June 30, 2019 08:57PM

Re: Steam and snowy mountains on Iron Ore RR Attachments

Olaf Rasmussen July 02, 2019 03:50PM

Re: Steam and snowy mountains on Iron Ore RR Attachments

Olaf Rasmussen July 02, 2019 04:06PM

Re: Steam and snowy mountains on Iron Ore RR Attachments

Olaf Rasmussen July 02, 2019 04:23PM

Re: Steam and snowy mountains on Iron Ore RR Attachments

Olaf Rasmussen July 02, 2019 04:45PM

Re: Steam and snowy mountains on Iron Ore RR

Greg Scholl July 02, 2019 05:29PM

Re: Steam and snowy mountains on Iron Ore RR . . . thumbs upthumbs up

Russo Loco July 02, 2019 07:31PM

Re: Steam and snowy mountains on the narrow gauge in AK Attachments

bcp July 02, 2019 06:56PM

Re: Steam and snowy mountains on the narrow gauge in AK

Olaf Rasmussen July 04, 2019 09:05PM

Re: Steam and snowy mountains on the narrow g Attachments

Olaf Rasmussen July 04, 2019 09:14PM

Re: Steam and snowy mountains on the narrow gauge in AK

bcp July 04, 2019 09:15PM



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